Writer vs. Writer Interview: G.C. McKay

Today we have G. C. Mckay, one of the new writers of transgressive literature, psychological horror, and philosophical novels which explore the dark and disturbing recesses of the human psyche. I got to know about him on his Youtube Channel in which he interviews other authors in the genre, reviews transgressive books, or chitchat with his fellows who they call themselves, "the bastards". Well, I guess it's easy to understand he became one of my favorite writers and authortubers at the moment. Let's see what this witty, sarcastic, and fearless author has to say.


1.Hi there McKay. First thing first, tell us when did you decide to become a writer in the Transgressive Genre.


In truth, it was never really a conscious decision but more of a blatant inevitability, knowing what got my juices flowing throughout the years that led to my writing endeavors. I do remember wondering, whilst penning my earliest pieces, ‘just what kind of genre is this, realism?’ Then, after some research, I stumbled across Transgressive Fiction and thought, ‘ah, shit. Yeah, that’s me. Fuck.’

2.That was my immediate reaction too. What is it about the Transgressive Genre that attracts you?


I think my fellow bastard from the podcast, Cody Sexton, summed it up fairly recently actually, describing it as “the only genre out there with any balls left.” I couldn’t have put it better.


3.Couldn't agree more. But I'm curious. What do you think makes a good story?


Anything that assaults your psyche whilst writing it, potentially re-wiring your brain’s chemical makeup. Now, that sounds wank, but I do believe literature should challenge the reader’s perception rather than just simply entertain. If it can do both, then great, but there’s enough mindless entertainment out there as it is, so I’d favour attacking the reader over simply distracting them in between scrolling through their goddamn phones.


4.Exactly. Many people write for the pleasure of a mass who do not have any desire to think. Transgressive Fiction and art are not for the mass. May I know when did you first realize you wanted to be a writer? And as a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?


After training to be an actor and becoming disillusioned with its career prospects and the majority of plays out there. Around 90% of them kind of repulsed me, whilst the dangerous, remaining 10% got me thinking that I’d like to try my hand at producing something even better. I naturally fell into literature as I became more reclusive, since I preferred the individual responsibility of the art. When working in film, for instance, you’re let down by people a lot. With writing, you’re the only one who can make it happen.

As a kid, I fell into fantasies of all sorts, usually based off movies I adored. All of them seemed to involve pretending (acting) so I presumed that was what I wanted to pursue. As time progressed, I realised it was more narrative and storytelling that really buzzed me, so here I am, mythologising my life away.


5.Fantastic. For each of your books, how long did it take you to write?

The more I write the more I realise that each book comes with its own demands. I believe it takes a minimum of five years to become any good at it, or at least find your voice and style. Fubar took me close to 4 years, whilst Heather took 7 months. Since the former was my first novel, and is over double the length of the latter, I believe that’s where I learnt the most about what I was trying to accomplish with my writing. Nowadays, I don’t pay too much attention to time, since I generally write the first few drafts and then leave a piece alone for weeks or months at a time. Sometimes longer. I’ve found this to be the best way of becoming truly indifferent to your own work, where you can look at a story with a stranger’s eye, so to speak, then really ‘see’ what kind of story is on the page. In essence, I let the story tell me what it wants to say, rather than the other way round. It’s a little schizophrenic, I must say. I also read my stuff aloud, a lot, and discuss it with myself whilst doing so. Just in case you needed further proof, ha.